What does an artwork look like? One could attempt to answer this question by showing a collection of images of acknowledged works of art. But such an answer, by which art is asked to define itself, is a classic example of circular reasoning. Perhaps it's an unfair question since the look of an artwork can be infinitely various, yet we are we able to distinguish a work of art from the everyday fol-de-rol of ordinary stuff. This project attempts an entirely visual answer, communicating about the appearance of art without depicting any actual artworks, reflecting my own experience as a viewer of art and as a photographer.

 
Untitled (mirror)
2018

 

 

 

Untitled (blackboard)
2017

 

 

 

Untitled (booklet)
2015

 

 

 

Untitled (chair)
2018

 

 

 

Untitled (mesh model)

2016

 

 

 

Untitled (overpainted graffiti)
2015

 

 

 

Untitled (overpainted graffiti)
2015

 

 

 

Untitled (ACME)
2016

 

 

 

Untitled (light switch)
2014

 

 

 

Untitled (coffee shop restroom)
2013

 

 

 

Untitled (gallery window)
2012

 

 

 

Untitled (beauty shop restroom)
2010

 

 

 

Untitled (manhole cover)
2012

 

 

 

2011

 

 

 

2011

 

 

 

2010

 

 

 

2011

 

 

 

2010

 

 

 

2010

 

 

 

2009

 

 

 

2011

 

 

 

2009

 

 

 

2011

 

 

 

2009

 

 

 

2016

 

 

 

2011

 

 

 

2010

 


My earlier project, Color Photographs (1976–1981), is prologue to Photographs of Things That Look Like Art. In 1976, after several years of photographing in the studio, I wanted to see how my art-inspired vision could apply to conventional photographic practice. Although I didn't think of it this way at the time, I sought out subjects that I could photograph as if artworks.

All photographs on this page are 18"×24" digital pigment prints.